Becoming the Best at Getting Better

Interpreting Conference presented by Cincinnati Children’s and KITA

Interpreting is a profession of continual learning and development.

But how do you do that?

Join us October 13 at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center to learn how together!

CEUs will be offered through CEAP, IMIA, RID, and state courts.

Agenda

8:00 - 8:30 Registration
8:30 - 8:45 Opening
8:45 - 9:00 Break
9:00 - 10:00 Workshop 1
  • Better Than Before: Improving Interpreting Through Deliberate Practice and Feedback
  • Basics of Medical Terminology
  • Off the Job Training: Self Assessment and Practice Exercises
10:00 - 10:15 Break
10:15 - 11:15 Workshop 2
  • What would you do? Best Practices for Difficult Situations
  • Self Care for the Interpreter: Recognizing and Avoiding Burnout and Secondary Traumatization
  • Boosting Memory for Accurate Interpretation
11:15 - 11:30 Break
11:30 - 13:00 Keynote
Staying on top of the Game: It’s not a Game
13:00 - 14:15 Lunch
14:15 - 15:45 Workshop 3
  • Tips for Interpreters in Forensic Interviews for Suspected Child Maltreatment
  • Interpreting Bad News: What Interpreters Might Learn from Medical Training and Research
  • Help Me Help You: Provider Feedback as a Driver for Change in Training Practice
15:45 - 16:00 Break
16:00 - 17:00 Workshop 4
  • Using Simultaneous Interpreting in Medical Settings
  • Consecutive Notetaking & Symbols
  • Collaborating with a Speech-Language Pathologist

Staying on top of the Game: It’s not a Game

Claudia E. Villalba

Claudia E. Villalba

During this fast-paced keynote presentation, participants will be introduced to the concept of the Interpreter’s Zones and the importance of differentiating between performance and learning. Based on the concepts developed and taught for DE LA MORA’s signature interpreter program, the importance of self-assessment as an integral part of performance improvement will be presented. David Kolb’s learning Stages will be discussed and their application to the model will be explained. At the end of the presentation the participants will be able to:

  • Develop an organized plan to apply the concept of the learning cycle

  • Objectively self-evaluate their performance

  • Attain goals by creating specific objectives

  • Use research strategies to create their own training materials, utilizing both, their previous knowledge and newly acquired vocabulary

Claudia E. Villalba

Claudia E. Villalba is a freelance court interpreter with over 20 years experience. She is certified at the federal level by the U.S. Administrative Office of the U.S. Courts, and certified in the State of Florida, formerly a Master Level Interpreter in the State of New Jersey where she worked during the first ten years of her profession in Hudson and Middlesex County Superior Courts before moving to Florida where she was the Supervising Court Interpreter for the 7th Judicial Circuit for 11 years. She has been a subject matter expert for both the State and the Federal certification program for court interpreters. She has been an instructor for De La Mora Interpreter Training for more than 8 years providing on-site and on-line training and one-on-one tutoring. Claudia, a Colombia native, is very passionate about the interpreting profession, language access rights and she enjoys sharing her knowledge and experience with aspiring interpreters as a way of paying it forward.


Workshops

Understanding medical terminology is essential to all medical interpreters. We will navigate through the components of medical terms (root words, prefixes and suffixes) and techniques for learning them.

Basics of Medical Terminology

Rafik Mohand
Arabic Interpreter
Cincinnati Children’s


Better than Before: Improving Interpreting Through Deliberate Practice and Feedback

Liz Essary
Associate Faculty
Indiana University-Purdue University at Indianapolis

We often hear “practice makes perfect,” but if we don't have specific goals for our practice, or a way to measure our progress, we end up practicing our mistakes and never moving forward. Deliberate practice and feedback that are interpreter-driven help get us out of that rut, and move forward to our goals, from passing certification exams, to improving note taking, or adding new background knowledge and vocabulary. The presenter shares specific approaches interpreters can use that are rooted in deliberate practice in order to achieve their goals.


Boosting Memory for Accurate Interpretation

Elba Madison
VP of Quality
Affordable Language Services

Memory is a crucial part of interpreting and in the interpreter’s performance when rendering consecutive and simultaneous interpretation. Using proven memory techniques improves the interpreter’s memory skills leading to accurate and faithful interpretation and increasing the quantity of information an interpreter can process.


Interpreters play a unique role when collaborating with speech-language pathologists (SLP). Not only is the interpreter interpreting information between the SLP and patient, the interpreter also supports the SLP in helping to identify breakdowns in communication due to the patient's speech and/or language difficulties.

Collaborating with a Speech-Language Pathologist

Maria Weyler
Speech-Language Pathologist
Cincinnati Children’s

Susan Denges
Speech-Language Pathologist
Cincinnati Children’s


Learn an easy and effective way to improve your notetaking technique by changing the way you normally take notes. I will also teach you how to come up with personalized symbols to facilitate a more accurate consecutive interpretation.

Consecutive Notetaking & Symbols

Diana Lopez-Alers
Spanish Interpreter
Cincinnati Children’s

Fabiola Munafo
Spanish Interpreter
Cincinnati Children’s


Professional medical interpreters receive training on the code of ethics, best practices, and the value of conducting a pre-session before an interpreting assignment. These educational opportunities help interpreters to find ways to provide safe and effective care for patients and families with limited English proficiency (LEP) without breaking any professional boundaries. While interpreters work with medical providers daily there is little opportunity for them to exchange real-time feedback and incorporate it in each other’s daily practices in a way that is meaningful. Furthermore, while most interpreters receive training on effective delivery of message when providing language services, much is yet desired regarding enhancing their interaction with medical providers. In order to communicate with LEP families effectively and reduce health disparities among our LEP families, better understanding of both perspectives of those who provide language services and those who use those services when caring for LEP patients in the hospital is crucial. In this session, we will share the results of a study conducted at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center that used interactive group sessions called Group Level Assessment (GLA) with inpatient medical providers (physicians and nursing/ancillary staff) and interpreters.

Help Me Help You: Provider Feedback as a Driver for Change in Training Practice

Fabiola Munafo
Spanish Interpreter
Cincinnati Children’s

Angela Choe
Clinical Fellow
Cincinnati Children’s


Delivering bad news is one of the hardest tasks in the medical field: doctors, medical students, and nurses are often faced with this challenge and we, the interpreter, are no different. This presentation is going to equip the interpreter with the necessary tools to be prepared and anticipate the different scenarios that might be encountered in this type of interpreting session. This training will provide the most common questions asked by physicians to patients when delivering bad news, aiding the interpreter to be prepared emotionally and linguistically.

Interpreting Bad News: What Interpreters Might Learn from Medical Training and Research

Analía Lang
Trainer
Martti


Interpreters have an ethical duty to continually further their knowledge and skills. Practice outside interpreting encounters is essential to fulfilling this duty, and a key component of any interpreting practice is self evaluation. We'll review different methods of self evaluation and a variety of exercises designed to improve specific skills interpreters depend on.

Off the Job Training: Self Assessment and Practice Exercises

Andy Schwieter
Interim Manager of Language Access Services
Cincinnati Children’s


The longer you are an interpreter, the more valuable you become to the community you serve. The longer you are an interpreter the more likely you have been exposed to trauma and are at risk for burnout. This workshop will highlight the signs of secondary traumatization and burnout and strategies for self care. You will leave with the tools to care for yourself whether you are an OPI, VRI or on-site interpreter.

Self Care for the Interpreter: Recognizing and Avoiding Burnout and Secondary Traumatization

Erika Shell Castro
Vice President, Language Services Advocacy
Martti


Interpreter services is a vital role within healthcare systems. Interpreters are put in many delicate situations and are hearing and relaying very sensitive and personal information. Child abuse is a topic that is not easy to hear, but certainly something that is not uncommon. This presentation will discuss the specifics of interpreting within the context of a forensic interview, focusing on working with the interviewer, best practice within the interview, and the importance of self care.

Tips for Interpreters in Forensic Interviews for Suspected Child Maltreatment

Andrea Richey
Social Worker II
Forensic Interviewer
Cincinnati Children’s

Cristina Mella
Spanish Interpreter
Cincinnati Children’s


Medical interpreters are primarily taught to interpret consecutively. But sometimes, consecutive interpretation just doesn’t work, especially in mental health diagnosis and counseling, group settings, and pediatrics. In this workshop, we’ll discuss the standards and best practices for using simultaneous interpreting in medical settings. Following a demonstration, we’ll break into small groups to practice. Using patient, provider and scenario profile sheets, each group will roleplay a scenario that calls for simultaneous interpreting, such as a trauma victim counseling session, group therapy, and the four-year-old who ignores the doctor and just wants to tell you about his favorite toy.

Using Simultaneous Interpreting in Medical Settings

Jessica Cano
Kentucky Branch Manager
Vocalink Global


We will discuss several difficult situations medical interpreters encounter when working in a hospital setting to come up with best practice on how to resolve these issues, always adhering to our Code of Ethics.

What Would You Do? Best practices to difficult situations

Diana Lopez-Alers
Spanish Interpreter
Cincinnati Children’s

Fabiola Munafo
Spanish Interpreter
Cincinnati Children’s